Major — Comparative Politics

Minor — International Relations

Annelle’s dissertation studies how Arab monarchies use nation-building and state control of religious discourse to produce a national “brand” of Islam. Official religious discourses draw on invented traditions of national religious heritage to encourage loyalty to the regime and discourage violence. During nine months of fieldwork in Jordan, Oman, and Morocco, she interviewed religious officials and Islamist activists to evaluate the extent to which they identified with their national brand of Islam. The research has implications for evaluating state-led counter-terrorism strategies, as well as for understanding the implications of government control of religious discourse. 

Current Research

Comparative politics of the Middle East, politics and religion, Islamism, nation-building, counter-terrorism

Education

B.A. New York University, 2008
M.A. George Washington University, 2015
Ph.D. George Washington University, expected 2017
 

Publications

Academic Publications:

"Constructing an Islamic Nation: National Mosque Building as a Form of Nation-building." Under review.

Sheline, Annelle. "Ibadism and the Tradition of Tolerance in Oman." Studies on Ibadism and Oman. Vol. 12 (Summer 2017).

Other Writing:

Middle East Regimes are Using ‘Moderate’ Islam to Stay in Power.” The Washington Post – Monkey Cage. March 1, 2017.

Calling Yemen a Proxy War is an Oversimplification,” Turkish Policy Quarterly, June 12, 2015.

"Who Will Be Egypt's Next President?" The World Post. May 24, 2012.

Office Hours

By Appointment

Classes Taught

Annelle is the Research Instructor and Director of the Elliott School Undergraduate Scholars program for 2017-2018. Trained as a Writing in the Discipline (WID) teaching assistant, she have served as a teaching assistant for WID designated (writing intensive) courses in comparative politics, international security, and Middle East politics.